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Are Dogs Allowed In Dunelm? [According To Their Staff?]

Do you need to head down to Dunelm? Perhaps you just want to have a browse and a look around. Either way, can you take your dog along with you? Will they be allowed and welcome in the store? Well, here is all you are going to want to know.

So, are dogs allowed in Dunelm? Dogs are generally not allowed in Dunelm stores. Although, it has been known for some stores to allow dogs at times, at the discretion of the staff/store manager. Nonetheless, guide and assistance dogs are always allowed as per the 2010 Equality Act.

I actually took to Social Media to see if Dunelm had publically stated anything on this particular matter.

Turns out, they have.

See this tweet from Dunelm’s official Twitter in 2019:

So there we have it.

But it’s a little inconvenient right?

Particularly if you intend on actually buying some dog supplies down at Dunelm!

But why is this policy in place? Besides, they don’t sell food or any type of perishable product that is at risk of contamination?

Well, I just got off the phone with a member of staff at Dunelm to find out.

Here is what she told me.

Why Does Dunelm Not Allow Dogs

Dunelm does not allow dogs because it is not a particularly dog-friendly store. There are large and potentially dangerous items, breakable objects and there is no guarantee a dog will behave well. At the same time, other customers could be scared of dogs or even have allergies to them.

Let us explore each one in a little more detail.

Dangerous & Breakable Objects

Once you step into a Dunelm, you’ll actually realize how many potential hazards there are.

A store that sells furniture, rugs, blinds, lighting, kitchen, and bath supplies; there’s a lot of potential danger there.

So it’s actually in the interest of your dog that they are not in such an environment.

Besides, they could always knock into something or knock something off.

That could not only harm them but other people.

Or it could harm your wallet or purse!

Store Layout

Following on and similarly related, Dunelm stores (while large) are not the most convenient to navigate.

Particularly when there are a lot of people in there are at any one time.

Dogs can simply ‘get in the way’, be a trip hazard or just take up a lot of space.

Dog Behaviour

Your dog might be a small and well-behaved breed. It may be well trained and socialized.

But that’s not the case for all dogs.

Some do not behave well in public places or new environments.

And as such, they could pose a danger to other people. Either directly or indirectly.

And some people are scared of dogs too.

Consider that.

Some people just want to go out for a shop without coming into contact with a dog.

And that leads us to the next point…

Allergies

Many people have allergies to dogs.

And chances are it’s not just the customers; some members of staff will likely have allergies to dogs too.

Any dander or hair that is shed onto the ground/shelves or products is not only unhygienic but could also set off such allergies.

The solution; preventing them access altogether.

A Note On Guide & Helper Dogs

We can see that Dunelm allows guide and helper dogs. But what are these exactly? What is a fair definition of such dogs?

Well, guide and helper dogs are assistance dogs.

In other words, they are purposefully trained dogs that support an individual going about their day-to-day lives.

Typically such individuals have some form of disability.

Now, assistance dogs are registered and certified.

I know what you may be thinking, but my dog helps me do this, or do they help me do that?

Well, unless they are certified and officially licensed as an assistance dog, you will not be admitted entry into Dunelm.

Often assistance dogs will have ID tags, colors, or harnesses that clearly identify them.

Dunelm staff will be mindful of this.

Besides, these dogs are very well trained, usually of particular breeds and are very well socialized, too.

Finally

Dogs are not typically allowed in Dunelm.

Although, you will often hear reports of some people who have managed to take their dogs inside.

While they may have got away with it and while staff may have turned a blind eye, it’s important to know that this would have been against company policy.

That is of course unless they were certified guide or assistance dogs.

So, your main options are either leaving your dog in the car (not advised), having someone stand outside with your dog while you pop inside, or coming back on your own.

It’s not ideal, but the no-dog policy does make sense when we consider the reasons for it.

Wondering what other supermarkets and stores’ dog policies are? Check out my other guides below: